Overcoming Injury: Is it really all about the physical recovery?

September 26, 2016

 

 

Today we bring you a brief inspirational story to help anyone understand how to overcome any serious injury. Video of the results at the end.

 

Do you watch or participate in a sport at any level?  Are you committed to training regardless whether you play sports or not?  Do your kids play any sports? Do you have a friend of a friend of a friend whose big brother plays a sport?

 

If you answered yes to just one of those questions, you NEED to read on…

 

Regardless if you play sports, watch sports or just train bc you love crushing the iron I’m sure you have some sort of experience overcoming a serious injury.  You could have been seriously injured or you likely know someone who suffered through a major injury.  As a competitive athlete and now gym owner/ultra MeatHead, I’ve had a ton of experience in this matter.

 

The hardest part about overcoming a serious injury is the mental and emotional struggle one must battle through.  At first, when you see or have a bad injury you think it’s all about the physical recovery.  That’s true, but I strongly believe the mental/emotional struggle bears much more weight (pun intended) than the physical.  

 

When a professional football player tears his ACL he knows that he’s going to get top of the line medical attention along with a top-notch rehabilitation program.  However, somewhere along the path to recovery he has to face the harsh reality that it’s not guaranteed he will have exactly the same abilities he had before the injury.  Then he’ll have anxiety if he can continue an NFL career.  Finally, when he is fully recovered and get’s back out there to bang heads, make cuts, and run full speed he needs the confidence in his newly repaired knee to play without hesitation.  

 

The same criteria are true for a young athlete.  It’s also true for your 20-year veteran MeatHead who just tore his bicep.  Maybe not the part about top of the line medical attention and all that, but the same process occurs, just on a different scale.  

 

Whether you play sports or just train to be a weekend warrior, you more than likely take pride in your physical appearance.  When you seriously injure yourself, you also have to face the harsh reality that you lose strength, your aerobic/anaerobic capacity dwindles, muscle atrophy takes its course and stiffness all around due to lack of mobility.  All of that definitely effects your confidence in yourself and your ability to return back to ‘the old you.’    

 

Look, injuries happen all the time.  There is no way to plan for them, but they do occur.   The longer you play, practice, train and compete, the higher the likelihood of a serious injury will happen.  I’m not trying to scare you or have you ditch your indoor soccer league.  Rather, I want you to know that if it does happen to you, you CAN and you WILL overcome it.  It won’t be easy.  It will take commitment and mental toughness, but you can get back to ‘the old you.’  

 

In fact, you can get back to a ‘BETTER version of you.’  Just like any tragedy, mistake, failure, or risk you will learn a lot about yourself.  You’ll learn more about your body (physical), your dedication to rehab (commitment level), your ability to stay positive throughout the recovery process (mental toughness), and then create a new course of action so you won’t have to have the same experience again.


Check out this short video about a College Cornerback overcoming all of these things after a surgical shoulder repair limited his abilities his entire sophomore season…

 

 

 

Visit www.jvhperformance.com/membership to learn how you can see the results from JVH like Matt has.

 

Dominate another Day

 

-Coach Hoke

 

 

Tags: training tips, jvh training, sports performance, team building, team training

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